Frequently Asked Questions

The ERP Vision 2020 Team would like to provide for you an area and opportunity to see frequently asked questions and to also submit questions.  The question will automatically be mailed to the Payroll Manager and then an answer will be posted back to this site.  We expect to have responses in 24 hours, M-F.

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Paycheck Distribution
Establish and Standardize Time Approval Policies
Timeliness of Timesheet Submittals
No Leave Adjustments for Prior Time Keeping Periods
Employee Reimbursements through Payroll
Move Non-Exempt to Hourly with Implementation of CyberShift
Standardize FLSA Work Week
Eliminate 9-80 Work Schedules
Change to Holiday Policy
FLSA Work Week View of Leave Charges
Require all Non-Contract Non-Exempt Employees to Clock In-Out Everyday
Compensatory Time for Exempt Employees
Bi-Weekly_Questions
Employee Questions

Paycheck Distribution

  • What is changing?

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    Manual distribution of pay advices and paychecks will be discontinued. Employees who have direct deposit will access their pay advice electronically rather than receive a hard copy from the department, via the MyBenefits portal.  Employees who receive a paycheck rather than direct deposit will have the option to enroll in direct deposit or have their pay check mailed to their home address.  They will also be able to view their pay stubs electronically.  Pay checks and pay stubs will no longer be distributed by the department.

  • Who will be affected?

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    All employees will be affected.

  • Why is the change being made and why does the employee care?

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    The change will improve department efficiency by eliminating manual distribution of paychecks and pay advices which is time consuming, expensive, and not productive to the departments' core businesses.  Employees benefit from automatic access to their funds if they enroll in direct deposit and can view their pay advices anytime electronically.

    The city would make this process change regardless of the implementation of CyberShift as it makes good business sense.

    If an employee chooses to have their paycheck mailed to his/her home, fewer City employees are involved in the distribution increasing privacy and security of pay information.    

  • When will this happen?

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    The change is underway with many employees already moved to direct deposit.  Employees may access pay information through My Benefits, Self Service access through the city's inside page.  Employees can navigate to:   http://www.cityofboise.org/EBenefits/ and login with their network user name and password.  The last manual distribution will be January 10, 2011. 

  • How long will it take for my paycheck to be mailed to my home?

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    One to five days, depending on where you live.

  • When will my paycheck be mailed to me?

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    Paychecks will be mailed the day prior to payday.

  • Do I have to sign up to have my pay stub mailed to my home?

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    Yes.  But you may always view your stub electronically. 

  • Is there a faster way to get my paycheck rather than by mail?

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    The fastest way for you to receive your paycheck is through Direct Deposit.  If you would like to sign up for direct deposit, navigate to  http://www.cityofboise.org/EBenefits/, direct deposit where a form is available.

  • Is the City legally required to provide me my paycheck at my work place or at the Human Resource Office?

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    The City is not legally obligated to provide that as an option. The distribution of paychecks and pay stubs online or through the mail complies with all applicable laws.

  • What if my paycheck gets lost in the mail?

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    You will need to notify Payroll immediately so the lost check can be verified, the address used is reviewed, a stop payment is placed on the check, and a new check can be issued.

  • Can I get my replacement check at my place of work or by picking it up at Human Resources?

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    This may be possible depending on the circumstances and the resources available. 

  • I am a temporary employee receiving a mid-month draw so I am not eligible for direct deposit. Can I now move to direct deposit?

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    No.  Temporary employees who take a mid-month draw are not eligible for direct deposit because each month the employee's hours are verified to be sure he or she has earned enough to cover the draw.  When the city moves to bi-weekly paychecks on July 31st, temporary employees can sign up for direct deposit.

Establish and Standardize Time Approval Policies

  • What is changing?

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    There are two changes.  First, the organization will standardize on having only one level of timesheet approval.  This means that only one supervisor (most likely the direct supervisor) will approve an employee's timesheet rather than a series of approvals.  Second, department Heads will be required to submit timesheets.

  • Who will be affected?

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    Supervisors in departments requiring multiple levels of timesheet approval and department heads will be impacted.

  • Why is the change being made and why does the employee care?

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    We are removing multiple approval levels to help gain process efficiencies.  The direct supervisor is in the best position to determine whether a timesheet is correct.  Additional approvals provide little added value in terms of accurate timesheet submittals.  

    Department heads already provide information for payroll purposes (e.g. an e-mail to the payroll person).  This step just allows the information to be entered directly into the system.

  • When will this happen?

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    In many departments, a single level approval is already in place.  The other departments will need to make this change when CyberShift is implemented.

    Department head entry and approval will also begin when CyberShift is implemented for their departments.

  • How is the whole timekeeping process going to work?

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    The goal is to capture and record an employee's time in a way that makes the most sense for the department.  The time collection process will be completed electronically (using computers, time clocks, phone, etc.).  Final timesheets will then be made available to supervisors for electronic approval.  Note that supervisors are only going to approve time worked and leave information - the various payroll rules will be checked by the system.

  • What's with all the check-in stuff? Feels like big brother. . .

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    No. This is not an attempt to catch you doing something wrong.  It is a step to make sure we are paying you correctly and that the city is meeting its legal obligations in terms of managing pay and benefits.

  • I am a second-tier approver and I need to see the information so I can better manage overtime, vacation, grant information, and so on. Why are you taking that tool away from me?

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    We are trying to become a more efficient organization.  As we go through the implementation, we hope to identify the information needed by supervisors to help manage their budgets.  Instead of having to look at time cards, we are expecting that we can provide second-tier supervisors with standard, easy-to-run reports that will provide the needed information.  Work flow may also be used to address concerns.  Although only the direct supervisor will be approving timesheets, second-tier management can still view employee's time records in their group.

Timeliness of Timesheet Submittals

  • What is changing?

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    Department Directors will be notified when it appears employees and/or supervisors are consistently late with timesheet submittals.

  • Who will be affected?

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    Anyone not being diligent about timely timesheet submittal and review.

  • Why is the change being made and why does the employee care?

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    A primary goal of the CyberShift implementation is to become more efficient.  This can only be accomplished if the timesheet submittal process is completed as designed.  If an employee and/or supervisor chooses not to be diligent about timesheet submittals, it can become a performance issue.

  • When will this happen?

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    Department Directors will be getting reports when CyberShift is implemented in their departments.  Please note that each employee should already be attentive to submitting timesheets in a timely manner.

  • What if I am gone for a long period of time and can't submit my timesheet?

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    Your supervisor can submit the information for you.

  • What if my supervisor is gone, causing my timesheet to be late?

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    Every supervisor will have a backup who can approve in his/her absence.

  • What happens if my timesheet does not get submitted?

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    You will be paid for hours worked, but your check may be delayed.  If there is a pattern it may lead to disciplinary action.

  • What is the due date?

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    Non-exempt employees will be clocking in and out daily.  Approval of exempt employees' time will be due by close of business Tuesday on a bi-weekly basis, at a minimum.

No Leave Adjustments for Prior Time Keeping Periods

  • What is changing?

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    Once a pay period has been processed and the reported time is finalized, adjustments will not be made unless it is to correct an error.  In the past, employees were allowed to request changes such as replacing a vacation day with a floating holiday.  This type of adjustment is not an error and will no longer be made.  This change is a business decision and is unrelated to the software implementation.

  • Who will be affected?

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    This will impact all employees.

  • Why is the change being made and why does the employee care?

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    The implementation of CyberShift is necessary to gain efficiencies in time reporting.  A prior period adjustment takes a lot of staff time and the elimination of these adjustments will make us more efficient.

  • When will this happen?

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    When CyberShift goes live.

  • We have always been able to do this in the past. Why not now?

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    We are trying to be smarter and more efficient about how we process payroll.  The organization can no longer afford to make these courtesy adjustments.   

  • What if I called in sick and my supervisor entered vacation time for me instead? Can these types of mistakes be changed?

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    Yes.  The city is obligated to make the change because it is an error.

Employee Reimbursements through Payroll

  • What is changing?

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    Employees will be able to receive reimbursable costs through their paycheck rather than through a separate check.

  • Who will be affected?

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    All employees currently being reimbursed for mileage and cell phone stipends.

  • Why is the change being made and why does the employee care?

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    The City will save the cost of processing and printing separate checks and the employee will receive only one check/direct deposit.  This change does not have anything to do with the new time-keeping system being installed.

  • When will this happen?

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    After the Enterprise Resource Planning payroll module is implemented.  Because the reimbursement will go through payroll and is not a function of time reporting, the implementation of CyberShift will not result in any change to the current process.

  • Do I still have to submit documentation to support the reimbursement or stipend?

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    Yes, the process you currently follow will not change.

  • Do I have to have it done this way or can I still get a separate check?

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    Employees will no longer receive reimbursement through a separate check.  Exceptions will only be made in very rare circumstances.

Move Non-Exempt to Hourly with Implementation of CyberShift

  • What is changing?

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    Currently employees are paid the same monthly amount regardless of the number of work days in the month (unless there is overtime).  Non-exempt employees will now be paid for the actual number of hours worked during the pay period.     

  • Who will be affected?

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    This will affect all non-exempt employees and will include both general and contract employees.

  • Why is the change being made and why does the employee care?

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    It is a standard business practice to pay non-exempt employees on an hourly basis.  CyberShift is designed to this standard.  

  • When will this happen?

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    All general non-exempt employees will be changed to hourly July 31, 2011 except those in Police and Fire who will move when we bring up Police and Fire Contract Employees in Phase II.

  • How will this impact my paycheck?

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    The city is moving to a bi-weekly payroll at the same time as the switch to hourly for non-exempt.  That will allow for each paycheck to be the same.  A tool is currently being developed to help you calculate the difference in your paycheck caused by the change.

Standardize FLSA Work Week

  • What is changing?

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    Employees will now be assigned to a standard work week of Sunday from 12:00:01 am through Saturday 12:00:00 am.

    A work week is seven consecutive days where the normal threshold is 40 hours per week.  The Fair Labor Standards Act uses the work week as the standard for computing overtime pay, and each week stands alone. Any hours worked over 40 during a work week are considered FLSA overtime.

  • Who will be affected?

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    All city employees with exceptions for Fire and/or Police contract employees.

    Some employees currently are assigned the standard work week, so a change is unnecessary.

  • Why is the change being made and why does the employee care?

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    All employees are moving to a standardized work week to facilitate the move from a monthly payroll to a bi-weekly payroll.  A standardized work week will allow for the biweekly system to be implemented without costly customization of the payroll processing system (CyberShift).

    Multiple FLSA work weeks would result in multiple payrolls.

    Example:  If an employee's work week ended on Sunday rather than Saturday, his or her payroll would be processed with those working the standard week ending the FOLLOWING Saturday.  As a result, their payroll could not be processed within the 15 days required Idaho Law or two payrolls would have to be run.

    Most employees will not realize any impact.

  • When will this happen?

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    Many employees have already moved to the standard work week.  Every employee must be moved to the standard by February 1, 2011.

  • Is the move to a standardized work week an effort to avoid paying employees overtime?

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    No, the standardized work week is not intended to reduce overtime.  However, there could be some weeks where under your current schedule, you would earn overtime and with the new schedule you will not.  The reverse could also be true, where there could be weeks where you earn overtime with your new work week and would not have under your old work week.  Or the overtime will shift from one week to the previous or next.

  • Can I continue to work my flex schedule with the standardized work week?

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    This depends on what your current flex schedule is and if you are exempt or nonexempt.   The ability to continue to work a flex schedule is dependent on whether the standard work week and your flex schedule now creates an overtime burden for the city.    Also, flexible schedules must be approved by your supervisor.

    For additional information please refer to the Flexible Schedules and Work Week Policy - 3.10b.

    Please also refer to the Elimination of 9/80 and 12/80 work schedules policy below.

  • I am an exempt employee, so will I be impacted?

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    Exempt employees will be impacted if they do not already work the standard work week.  Because exempt employees do not earn overtime, they will see less of an impact.  Exempt employee's schedules need not be impacted as they are set between the employee and his or her supervisor and not an FLSA issue.  Please refer to the Flexible Schedules and Work Week Policy - 3.10b.

Eliminate 9-80 Work Schedules

  • What is changing?

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    9/80 schedules will be eliminated for non-exempt employees. A 9/80 schedule allows employees to work nine hour days and take off one day every other week.

  • Who will be affected?

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    Approximately 50 nonexempt employees currently work a 9/80. Exempt employees may continue to work a 9/80 if approved by their supervisor.  Please refer to the Flexible Schedules and Work Week Policy - 3.10b for further information on flexible schedules and workweeks.

  • Why is the change being made and why does the employee care?

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    To avoid overtime accruals, these schedules require a work week that differs from the standard work week of Sunday from 12:01:01 am through Saturday 12:00:00 am.  As a result, they will be eliminated.

    Most employees will not realize any impact.

  • When will this happen?

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    Many employees have moved off the 9/80 schedule already in preparation for the standardized work week.  With the due date to move to the standardized work week February 1. 2011, 9/80 schedules will also be eliminated that same date.

  • As an exempt employee, can I continue to work my flex schedule with the standardized work week?

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    Flexible schedules for exempt employees may continue but must be approved by your supervisor. For additional information please refer to the Flexible Schedules and Work Week Policy - 3.10b.  

  • Why are non-exempt employees being treated differently than exempt employees?

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    Exempt employees do not accrue overtime, thus a flexible schedule does not result in overtime accrual.  Also, flex schedules for exempt employees do not create a financial impact to the city, so special programming in the payroll system is unnecessary.

  • 7. As a non-exempt employee, can I waive my overtime in order to continue on a 9/80 schedule?

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    No, employees cannot waive their overtime.  This violates the FLSA.

  • 8. My supervisor requires me to work a non-standard schedule for business reasons that results in overtime. May I do this?

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    Yes, you may, but appropriate overtime must be paid.

  • I really enjoy having an extra day off every other week with the 9/80 compressed schedule. Can I change to a 4/10 schedule to allow for an extra day off each week?

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    Yes, 4/10 schedules are allowed and work with the standardized work week. As a flexible schedule, you will need to get your supervisor's approval.  For additional information please refer to the Flexible Schedules and Work Week Policy - 3.10b.

Change to Holiday Policy

  • What is changing?

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    1. A holiday is being defined as 8 hours for all full-time employees.  Currently, each employee receives a day off equal to the number of hours he or she is regularly scheduled to work.
    2. In order to be paid for a holiday, employees must be in a paid status the work day prior to the holiday (the day after requirement has been eliminated).  Paid status means an employee is working or is on vacation leave, sick leave, compensatory time or jury duty.
    3. If a holiday falls on an employee's day off, the employee must take an alternate day within the 2-week pay period or it may be booked as compensatory time.  Currently, the employee can take an alternate day off during the month.
  • Who will be affected?

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    Largely the employees working non-traditional schedules (e.g. 4/10s)  

  • Why is the change being made and why does the employee care?

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    There are some software programming savings, but it is primarily a management decision to provide equity for all employees.  As an example, if two employees make an identical annual wage and one is on a 5/8 schedule and the other is on a 4/10 schedule, the employee on the 5/8 schedule works more hours for the same pay.  Looking at it a different way, an individual working 4/10s receives 20 more holiday hours than one working 5/8s.  The new policy corrects this inequity.

    This means that if an employee is working a 10-hour work schedule, the holiday will only cover 8 of those hours. Compensatory time, vacation time, or unpaid leave will need to be used to cover the additional 2 hours.  With the supervisor's permission, the time can be flexed within the FLSA work week.

    If an employee works a non-traditional schedule that causes her/him to miss a holiday, then, if the holiday is to be rescheduled, it must be rescheduled at some other point in the 2-week pay period.  The 2-week pay period is a change from the current policy that requires the time off to be taken within the month.  This prevents having to make manual adjustments across pay cycles.

  • When will this happen?

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    This change will occur March 1, 2011.

  • It's not my fault that I have to work a 10-hour day. . .that's the schedule the city gave me. Why are you penalizing me?

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    The policy change does not penalize those on alternative schedules.  Rather, it places all employees on an equal footing.

  • I work 4/10s and I must use 10 hours of vacation if I take a day off. Why isn't a holiday looked at in the same way?

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    The city is looking at the big picture to make sure that all employees get paid for working the same number of hours.

  • I will be on FMLA for 3 months over the Christmas holiday, but will no longer have paid leave at that point. Will I be paid for Christmas and New Year's?

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    No.  This is the current policy and is meant to keep the organization consistent with FMLA.

FLSA Work Week View of Leave Charges

  • What is changing?

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    The policy reaffirms that the city will view the work week as a whole rather than each day.

  • Who will be affected?

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    All city employees.

  • Why is the change being made and why does the employee care?

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    The city is adopting a standardized work week for all employees, except for contract employees of the Fire Department.  With the adoption of a work week philosophy, it was important to reaffirm the current practice of viewing the week for FLSA purposes rather than the day.

    For example, during a week where a regular full time employee (40 hours per week) works 10 hours on Monday and goes on vacation for the remainder of the week.  The employee charges 30 hours of vacation, not 32 because of the extra hours worked on Monday.

    Employees will not see a change from current practice.

  • When will this happen?

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    February 1, 2011 with the move to the standard work week for all general employees.

Require all Non-Contract Non-Exempt Employees to Clock In-Out Everyday

  • What is changing?

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    All non-contract non-Exempt employees will be required to clock in and out everyday rather than using the current method of elapsed time.

  • Who will be affected?

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    General non-exempt employees will be impacted.

  • Why is the change being made and why does the employee care?

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    Clocking in/out is expected to reduce the amount of time it takes an employee to enter time or fill out a timesheet, assuming little activity accounting is required.  The estimated cost savings to the city is around $30,000 per year in productivity.  Most employees fall into this category. However, if the employee is required to do activity accounting no time gain is expected.

  • When will this happen?

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    The change will occur when the employee is moved to the new timekeeping system.  Phasing begins March 1, 2011 with several departments.  All departments will be impacted by July 31, 2011.

  • Why aren't union non-exempt employees included?

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    Contract Employees are paid under a different set of pay rules.

  • What if I forget to clock in or out?

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    If an employee forgets to clock in or out, the supervisor will be able to make the correction to the employee's daily time record.

  • How will I clock in and out?

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    There are several ways to clock in/out depending on your work environment.  Employees working at a computer will likely use the web clock.  Field staff may use a phone to call in.  Some employees may use a time clock.  Each department will make the determination which method is appropriate for each of its work groups.

  • I am an exempt employee. How will I report my time?

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    Exempt employees will report their time in hours as they currently do.  Default entries can be set up then changed for exceptions such as vacation, sick, compensatory time.  If needed, the system will allow time tracking at a more detailed level depending on the needs of the department.  This could include grants, projects, special assignments, etc.

Compensatory Time for Exempt Employees

  • What is changing?

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    EMT considered a number of options to modify the current policy for compensatory time for exempt employees. At this time, the policy will remain unchanged.

Bi-Weekly_Questions

  • What is changing?

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    In an effort to be compliant with the Department of Labor and Internal Revenue Service laws, the city is no longer going to be offering a mid-month draw as of July 31, 2011, and will be moving to a bi-weekly payroll process which employees will be paid every other week.  Even though our current payroll process was somewhat common years ago (i.e. a month-end payroll with a mid-month draw), it is no longer considered an acceptable approach.  Both Federal and State agencies are patiently waiting for the City of Boise to complete the transition to bi-weekly payroll.

  • Who will be affected?

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    For General Employees the change to bi-weekly payroll will officially take place on July 31, 2011.  For Contract Employees in the Fire and Police Departments the change to bi-weekly payroll will officially take place on January 1st, 2012.

  • Why is the change being made and why does the employee care?

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    The city is making this change in order to be compliant with the Department of Labor and Internal Revenue Service laws.

    The employee should care as this change will affect cash flow on an individual basis.  Employees can see how this will affect their specific cash flow by using the tool developed to calculate the differences in each employee's paycheck caused by this change.  The ERP Vision 2020 Project site has a link to the Bi-Weekly Pay Estimator Tool.

  • When will this happen?

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    The change to bi-weekly payroll will officially take place on July 31, 2011.

  • How will this impact my paycheck?

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    The city is moving to a bi-weekly payroll at the same time as the switch to hourly for non-exempt employees.  That will allow for each paycheck to be the same.  A tool has been developed to help you calculate the difference in your paycheck caused by the change.  The ERP Vision 2020 Project site has a link to the Bi-Weekly Pay Estimator tool.

  • I am a temporary employee receiving a mid-month draw so I am not eligible for direct deposit. Can I now move to direct deposit?

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    No.  Temporary employees who take a mid-month draw are not eligible for direct deposit because each month the employee's hours are verified to be sure he or she has earned enough to cover the draw.  When the city moves to bi-weekly paychecks on July 31st, temporary employees can sign up for direct deposit.

  • What day of the week will be utilized for "payday" once a bi-weekly system is begun? What is the date of the first bi-weekly pay day?

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    The last monthly pay date will be paid on August 10, 2011.  The first Bi-Weekly pay date will be August 24, 2011, two (2) weeks later on a Wednesday and employees will be paid every other Wednesday thereafter.

  • What are the new pay dates for the bi-weekly calendar?

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    The ERP Vision 2020 Project site has a link to the Bi-Weekly Pay Estimator.  You can scroll down to the calendar under the calculation.

  • How will our contributions to Deferred Compensation be taken out when we move to Bi-Weekly? I am currently having $1,000 taken out. Will they take that from one check or can I just have $500 taken out from each check. And if so, when does the money go to Great West. Are funds only trasferred to them a certain day of the month. Thanks.

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    If you have a % contribution that is currently about $1,000 nothing needs to be done as it will be a % of a bi-weekly amount instead of a monthly amount.

    However, if you have a contribution that is a set dollar amount of $1,000 it will need to be converted to a bi-weekly amount.

    Since we are moving from 12 pay periods to 26 pay periods in a year the calculation would be $1,000 X 12 / 26 = $461.54 per bi-week.  You will need to access your account via MyBenefits to make a contribution change.

    There will be no deferred compensation taken on the August 24 check but will be taken out of your check every 2 weeks starting September 7, 2010.  Those contributions will be submitted to Great West after each pay check.

    As we get close to moving to bi-weekly we will be sending out notification to all employees that have a set dollar amount taken on a monthly basis with instructions how to change the contribution.

  • How will deductions be handled when we go to Bi-Weekly?

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    Most deductions will be taken over 24 pay periods rather than 26 pay periods.  This means they will only be taken out of the First two (2) pay checks of the month.  In the two (2) months where we get three (3) pay checks they will not be taken on the 3rd pay check.  This group of deductions include health related items and insurance premiums so the corresponding Flexible Benefit Credit and Wellness Credit will not be included on the 3rd pay check of the month either.

    There are some exceptions:

    1. Court related items such as garnishments, levies and child support will be taken on every pay check starting with the August 24 pay check even if the deductions are voluntary.
    2. Deferred compensation contributions will be taken on every pay check starting with the September 7, 2011 pay check.
  • When you input your 10th and draw check and it calculates your new biweekly pay, does this include the employee's deferred comp contribution? If it does, is it calculating what we pay now once a month? Example: Say now I pay $100 a month, so is my biweekly check calculation include $100 deduction or $50 each time?

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    The amounts input in the worksheet are the 'net' payroll amounts so they include the deferred compensation amounts. The resulting calculation of the bi-weekly amountsassumes all amountshave been converted to bi-weekly amounts.

    The worksheet is just an approximation.  It's purpose is to give employees ball-park amounts in order to plan.  In reality some deductions will be taken only during the first 2 paychecks of the month and not the third paycheck in the two months we get three paychecks.  Deferred compensation, however, will be taken out of all 26 bi-weekly paychecks each year.

    If you want to change your Deferred Compensation amount please log into MyBenefits.

    Or you can fill out a General Employee Contribution Form.

Employee Questions

  • How will holiday pay work for part-time employees who often don't work 4 or 8 hour days?

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    Holiday eligibility policy has not changed.  Part-time employee's eligibility is tied to their Standard Hours which is tied to their position, not a specific schedule or hours worked on a particular day.  Part-time employees who were eligible for 4 or 6 hours of Holiday Pay will continue to be.

  • Please explain changes to sick and annual leave accrual dynamics.

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    When we move to CyberShift as a Time & Attendance system we will be on a monthly accrual for sick and vacation leave so initially there will be no change.  When we move to a Bi-Weekly payroll, sick and vacation monthly accruals will be converted to their bi-weekly equivalent and be available for use after accrued every other week.  Annual accrual items like Floating Holiday will function as they always have.

  • Can a floating holiday be used in conjunction with a calendar holiday, it's not identified as time worked among those listed?

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    Assuming this has to do with the "Paid Status" requirement the day before a holiday; the answer is yes, with supervisor approval.  Remuneration for any approved leave the day before a holiday qualifies as "Paid Status."  Vacation, Sick, Compensatory Time, Jury Duty, Floating Holiday, Bereavement, etc. would all qualify.

  • Regarding the answer for #7, Question #1: Shouldn't the work week be Sunday 12:00:01 a.m. to Saturday 12:00:00 p.m.?

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    No, Sunday from 12:00:01 a.m. through Saturday 12:00:00 a.m. is correct.  It's basically midnight to midnight which is 12:00 a.m. Saturday.  12:00 p.m. would make it Saturday at noon which would be incorrect.

  • As an exempt employee, we are no longer allowed comp time and can not go over 40 hours in one week. In previous years comp time was allowed. Question - Why was this changed and what is the policy for 2011?

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    There has been no change in compensatory time policy for either Exempt or Non-Exempt employees. Compensatory time for Exempt Employees is still being reviewed as a component of an overall workforce planning effort unrelated to the ERP Vision 2020 project. Existing policy allows Department Directors to restrict work in excess of 40 hours during a work week to contain costs. See below for a more complete statement.

    Excerpt From: City of Boise Wage Payment and Overtime Regulation 3.25a

    B. Compensatory Time Accruals
    Non-exempt employees are not authorized to accrue in excess of one hundred hours of compensatory time. Non-exempt employees who have accrued 100 hours of compensatory time shall be paid for any additional hours worked in accordance with the City's overtime procedures. 

    Exempt employees are not authorized to accrue in excess of two hundred and forty (240) hours of compensatory time, but are expected to work as necessity dictates. 

    Department Directors shall not set lower compensatory time limits for either exempt or non-exempt employees, but may restrict work in excess of 40 hours during a work week to contain costs.

  • Why is vacation time considered not time worked? Example - You take Monday off as a vacation day, back to work on Tuesday and then on Wednesday your supervisor wants you to work 2 hours O/T. At the end of the week you have 42 hours on your time card but only get paid for 40 hours as the 2 hours O/T is deducted from your 8 hours vacation time on Monday. Shouldn't the O/T be at time and a half when deducted from your vacation, or should we get paid for two hours at time and a half?

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    Note: For general employees the answer is below.  For Fire and Police contract employees, their process is dictated by their contract.

    General Employees: There has been no change in how leave time is considered for overtime.  The Fair Labor Standards Act does not require any leave time to be considered toward the 40 hour threshold after which overtime is paid.  The City of Boise policy has been, and continues to be, that leave time does not count toward the 40 hours with the exception of Holiday which does count toward the 40 hours.

    What is being clarified as of January 1, 2011 is this:  The City will take an FLSA work week point of view of leave time used instead of each day standing on it's own. In other words, using your example, after the end of the week you should have 40 hours on your timesheet as follows:  34 hours worked and 6 hours of vacation where the 8 hours of vacation reported on Monday is reduced by the 2 additional hours worked on Wednesday and the 2 hours of vacation are added back to your vacation balance.

    With the implementation of the CyberShift system, after each FLSA work week ends at midnight Saturday, this calculation will be automated; i.e. the 8 hours of vacation time will be changed to 6, in your example, and 2 hours will be added back to your vacation balance.  The system then will send an electronic notification to you that the time was changed and it will also change the color of your approval record to red so your supervisor will know that something changed and will need to be approved.  That way, if the automatic calculation really should not have been made, both you and your supervisor will have the opportunity to discuss the situation and make any needed adjustments before time is sent to payroll.

    Note:  When CyberShift is implemented, anytime your time record is changed by someone other than yourself you will receive an electronic notification of the change.

    If you have questions on your specific situation, please call HR-Payroll at 384-3721.

  • If you work four tens and are required to take a day off when a holiday falls on a normally scheduled day off in your work week; like if one works Sunday through Tuesday then is forced to take Wednesday off because a Holiday is on Saturday then still have to pay for the two hours for a day you were forced to take off, this does not seem to be fair.

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    If a holiday falls on a scheduled day off then the holiday may be rescheduled anytime in the same pay period, with supervisor approval, or be credited for compensatory time.  There has been no change in the rescheduled holiday policy other than defining the time period as a pay period rather than a month.

    After March 1, 2011, A holiday is defined as 8 hours for all full-time employees as explained in Question 09, item 3 in this FAQ.  
    We will update the answer in Question 09, item 3 in this FAQ as well.
  • Could you guys elaborate on the need to "move from a monthly payroll to a bi-weekly payroll"?

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    Question Details: You mention one benefit being that it "will allow for each paycheck to be the same," but we have a lot of people who are paycheck to paycheck with bills (rent, for example) due on a fixed day each month. While a more predictable dollar amount on each bi-weekly check would be an advantage to part-time staff, wouldn't the negative consequences of irregular pay in a monthly context outweigh the positives of that change? In other words, the benefits we seem to be aiming for are negated by the fact that bills are paid monthly, not bi-weekly. I know that employee convenience is not the primary concern in this change, but I think you might be underestimating the problems that this change will cause for many employees.

     

    Answer:

    1.  We want to ensure that the City is in compliance with Department of Labor and Internal Revenue Service laws.  Even though our current payroll process was somewhat common years ago (i.e. a month-end payroll with a mid-month draw), it is no longer considered an acceptable approach.  Both Federal and State agencies are patiently waiting for the City to complete the transition to bi-weekly payroll.

    2.  Since we can no longer use a mid-month draw approach, a bi-weekly system is the next quickest way to get money into the hands of our employees.   We know that this will be a big change for many employees, so that is the reason we are putting the word out now.  

        Since bi-weekly payroll is so common in the workplace, we know that people have found ways to deal with the cash flow issues.  As one example, we have heard that some people set up a separate account that is used to pay all automatic payments.  The individual can then calculate how much to have direct deposited into that account from every paycheck to make sure the monthly payments can be made.  This, of course, is only one possible solution.   

    3.  We did consider a semi-monthly payroll, but the Executive Management Team chose not to head in this direction.  A semi-monthly payroll process would require custom computer programming, be more costly, and be more prone to error.   Since bi-weekly payroll is a best practice (the great majority of people in the United States are paid bi-weekly), it was decided this was the appropriate choice.

  • What day of the week will be utilized for "payday" once a bi-weekly system is begun? What is the date of the first bi-weekly pay day?

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    The last monthly pay date will be paid on August 10, 2011.  The first Bi-Weekly pay date will be August 24, 2011, 2 weeks later on a Wednesday and employees will be paid every other Wednesday there after.

  • When employees receive reimbursable costs through their paycheck rather than through a separate check are these reimbursements subject to taxes, FICA or counted as wages?

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    No they are not subject to taxes nor counted as wages.  There is a process to approve reimbursable expenses before the amounts are sent to payroll for processing to be sure they satisfy the 'Accountable Plan' rules so they will not be taxable. Then these amounts will be entered into the payroll system as negative deductions so they will not affect Wages, Tax, PERSI or other calculations.  Entering an amount as a negative deduction has the effect of adding that amount to the net pay.

  • Will I be able to clock in on my co-worker's computer if it is up and running?

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    Any computer that has an icon on the desk top for logging onto the system will allow employees to log on with their own userid and password.  Employees that share a computer will need to make sure they have logged off their own userid when finished clocking in or out.

  • I am non-exempt. Will I have to clock out/in for lunch?

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    The City is not requiring employees to clock in and out for lunch.  However, some Departments will require their employees to clock in and out for lunch.

    Note:  This answer was delayed because the issue was still under discussion.

  • So why is the city violating it's own policy 3.15d III which states that a holiday or compensatory time shall be equivalent to the hours listed in the employee's work schedule? I work a 4/10 schedule and it lists that I shall be compensated 10 hours. So now we are being forced to take our own accrued time off if we are only given 8 hours for a holiday. How can the city dictate when I use my vacation time?

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    The City's policies are being re-written to reflect policy changes approved by the Executive Management Team.  Those re-written policies are scheduled to be released before the first holiday that falls under the new policy.

    Employees have a choice of using vacation time, compensatory time or, with supervisor approval, flexing their schedule to make up the difference between 8 hours of holiday and a schedule that exceeds 8 hours.  No particular method is dictated.

  • Do employees realize, if this is started in July, employees will fall in the hole for pay until November which is when the pay will be made up with the 3rd payday in the month (November 20th)? I calculated that I will bring home $100 less in August, $300 less in September and October, then finally make up the difference at the END of the month in November. With the bad economy and gas prices expected to increase through summer, $300 a month is a big chunk of money.

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    The first day of the first Bi-Weekly pay period will be Sunday, July 31, 2011, and end Saturday, August 13, 2011, so the transition to Bi-Weekly will occur in August 2011.  The ERP Vision 2020 Change Manage Team is moving forward on several fronts over the next few months to educate employees how the transition from a Monthly payroll with a Mid-Month Draw to a Bi-Weekly payroll may affect them.  Every employee's situation is different and employees will be provided tools to determine how they will be affected and methods communicated for them to lessen the effect including gradually reducing their Mid-Month Draw amount.

  • I can't seem to find the calendar that was used during the presentation that shows the new pay dates in color. Thanks!

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    The ERP Vision 2020 Project site has a link to the Bi-Weekly Pay Estimator. You can scroll down to the calendar under the calculation.

  • If I understand the process, my net amount on the August 24 paycheck could be affected if my current mid-month draw is 30% or more. How can I find out if my current mid-month draw is 30% or more?

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    The July 25, 2011 Mid-Month is a draw on the August 10, 2011 check so that is the check that will be affected.  The August 24 check will be the first Bi-Weekly calculation and will be unaffected by the Mid-Month Draw.

    The ERP Vision 2020 website has a link to the Mid-Month Reduction Form with instructions how to determine what your draw percentage is.

  • I understand that the Deferred Compensation withdrawals will be taken out on every check we receive beginning in August instead of just one check as is the current payroll process. Who do I contact to change my Deferred Comp amounts so only 1/2 the total monthly amount comes out of each check?

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    If an employee's contribution is a set dollar amount it will need to be converted to it's bi-weekly equivalent.  To calculate the bi-weekly equivalent the current monthly amount is multiplied by 12 then divided by 26.  For example:  If the monthly contribution amount is $100 then the bi-weekly equivalent is $100 x 12 / 26 - $46 per bi-week.

    Changes can be made through the Employee Self Service link on the Inside page under Savings Plans.  If you have questions about this you can email benefits@cityofboise.org.

    Prior to moving to bi-weekly, employees with a set dollar amount in either the Savings Plan, W-4 or Direct Deposit will be contacted directly with instructions and any applicable forms that need to be updated.

  • Why does the committee want to complicate lives by beginning the bi-monthly pay periods in the middle of the year? Start Jan. 1 and make this transition easy for everyone.

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    The City has an obligation to move away from our current monthly pay period with a mid-month draw as soon as practical.  In addition, the City is implementing the payroll processing portion of this project on January 1st and we need to utilize resources we have to accomplish this.

    It will be no less challenging whether we make the move to bi-weekly on July 31st or January 1st.  The dynamics of the move and the effect on cash flow are the same.

  • I realize a bunch of people have submitted similar concerns/questions, however, I don't really see an answer to them so I would like to ask again. Five part question, details within.

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    Question Details:

    First, I see where you may be coming from saying that an 8/hr employee does not get the same holiday pay as a 10/hr employee.  However, that is simply not true.  You are basing the "10/hr employees get 20 more holiday paid hours than an 8/hr employee" on ALL THE HOLIDAYS OF THE YEAR.  Can you tell me what 10/hr employee works during every holiday in the calendar year?  Most are on Monday, then there's a Thursday and Friday.  Obviously a 10/hr employee is not working both Mondays and Fridays, so the answer to that would be none.  So that analogy is not an accurate statement.

    Second, an 8/hr employee is paid by the City for 40 hours in a week; so is a 10/hr employee.  We all get paid for 40 hours (not 42 hours or 38 hours).

    Third, how is it then fair for a 10/hr employee to have to burn 10 hours of Vac or Comp just to take one day off, but the 8/hr employee only has to burn 8 hours?  Seems to me that the 8/hr employee is then "getting" 2 extra hours every holiday, than the 10/hr employee ( say "getting" 2 extra hours, but really they get to "save" 2 more hours each holiday than the 10/hr employee does).  If you want to talk fair, I emplore you to take a look at that scenario.

    Fourth, So the City is not wanting to require a 10/hr employee to use their earned Comp or Vac on holidays.  Those are fringe benefits, as I understand it, but do not recall where it says we will be mandated to use it when it's convenient for the City.  The City has decided to not allow 10/hr employees to work on a holiday during their normal work week.  So is the City basically saying we now have to pay you, for your to force us to take a day off??????

    Fifth, Finally, the holiday compensation you are suggesting is in violation of policy.  This isn't really a question, but more of an observation.

     

    Answers:

    First question: You are correct that employees on a 4/10 shift get paid for 20 hours holiday pay more than employees on a 5/8 shift for holidays over the year.  This is in regards to employees who donotwork on a holiday.  Those that work on a holiday are compensation according to a City Policy which has not changed so was not part of the presentation.  At one meeting there was a question about when an employee works on a holiday but that is a separate issue from the number of holiday hours an employee receives.  I apologize for the confusion.

    Second question: It appears you are referring to the rule (program) I mentioned that will run after the end of the work week.  The example in the presentation was:  If an employee takes 8 hours of vacation on Tuesday but works more hours than expected by the end of the work week where they have 36 hours worked and 8 hours of vacation, then a program will run after the end of the work week that will change the 8 hours of vacation to 4 hours and put the extra 4 hours back in the employee's vacation bucket so they will get paid for 40 hours, not 44 hours.

    Third question: This is related to the first question.  Please refer to the charts below that show how the math works out under the old holiday policy and the new holiday policy.

    Fourth question:The new City Holiday policy gives non-exempt employees the option of using vacation, compensatory time or flex their work schedule with supervisor approval make up the difference between the employees schedule and the allowed holiday hours, if their schedule exceeds those allowed hours.

    Fifth question:  The city is currently rewriting the policies which are scheduled to be published before the first holiday that falls under the new holiday policy.

    Charts:

    Chart1-Question19.jpg

    Chart2-Question19.jpg


  • Why can't those who work 4/10s have the option of only working 38 hours in a holiday week? If we are talking about being equitable those working 5/8s are not being forced to use their vacation or comp time so why is the city forcing me to do so?

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    This question was taken to the Steering Committee then on to the Executive Management Team for discussion.

    The decision by the Executive Management Team was to not change the policy, i.e. employees on a 4/10 shift are required to use leave time, such as vacation or compensatory time, to arrive at 40 hours in a holiday week.

    The decision was, again, made on the equity issue.  Under the new holiday policy employees working 4/10s or 5/8s both are scheduled 40 hours per week.  Over a year that equates to 40 Hrs X 52 Weeks = 2,080 hours.  Both sets of employees receive 80 Holiday hours during that time and both sets of employees are required to work or use leave time for the remaining 2,000 hours in the year.

  • Question about mid-month pay. Details within.

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    Question:

    I'm trying to figure out if I need to have my mid-month pay reduced.  First, I don't understand the difference it will make.  I do understand that, after we go to the bi-weekly schedule, each month will be a little different due to the fact that I will be getting paid 26 times instead of 24; however, the part that confuses me is the fact that if I reduce my mid month, at this time, how does it not increase my pay on the 10th.  What happens with the money that is being taken away from my mid month pay?  For example, if I get $623.70 (30%) at mid month now and I reduce it to $415.80 (20%), where does that $207.90 difference go if not rolling over to the 10th?  Also, it was addressed in question 16 that the mid month pay on July 25th would actually be a draw on the August 10th check.  Does that mean that if after the conversion you are only making $950 (before taxes) every two weeks, your July 25th mid month check will only be $285 (30%) because it is based on the bi-weekly and not the monthly anymore.  That leads me back to my first question....does the money I'm reducing from my mid month help make up that difference?  If so, how?

     

    Answer:

    Assuming you made the change in one month, the $207.90 Mid-Month reduction does increase the 10th check next month by $207.90.  The 10th check each month thereafter would be $207.90 higher and the Mid-Month Draw will be $207.90 lower than it was before the change.  This will increase your cash flow in August when we convert to Bi-Weekly by $207.90 over what it would be if you did nothing.  This could help cash flow during September and October when cash flow will be lower.

    The Bi-Weekly Net Pay Estimator tool has been updated.  (See Employee Toolbox)  If you use the tool it will show you how the 25th amount is reduced by $207.90 and the 10th amount is increased by $207.90 the next month.

    July 25th is the last Mid-Month Draw and is still based on a monthly amount.  It is an advance on the August 10th check which is the last monthly pay calculation.  The August 24th check is the first Bi-Weekly pay calculation and pay will be fully calculated every 2 weeks after that.


  • Why has my question not had a response?

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    There are 3 reasons why a response might not be posted:

    1. The question merits discussion by the Steering Committee and possibly the Executive Management Team before a response can be posted.
    2. The question has already been answered.  Please re-read the questions and answers.
    3. The question does not pertain to the Vision 2020 project.  Feel free to contact Human Resources to discuss you question further.
  • Will the time clock only be for the non-exempt employees, or everyone?

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    We are required by law to calculate payroll for exempt and non-exempt employee's in different ways so we need to collect the time data in different ways.  From a payroll processing perspective, the time clocks will be for non-exempt employees.
  • If this new system is about efficiency, how come it will take 11 days to get the first paycheck out, rather than the 10 days it takes now?

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    Efficiency is improving accuracy with less effort and time required to get the work done rather than the number of days in the processing schedule.  Today the time collection process is averaging 22 minutes per employee for the payroll administrator to validate and process the timesheetbeforeit is sent to HR-Payroll for processing.  Once implemented, the new time collection process is expected to average less than 2 minutes per employee.  That is where efficiency is gained.  For most employees, the amount of time it takes to enter their time will be reduced.

    After the deadline for timesheets being due has passed, HR-Payroll processing begins which calculates gross to net and produces pay checks.  That process is not currently changing.  The bi-weekly, holiday and bank schedules dictate what day certain steps in the process occur, which in turn sets our overall process schedule.

  • If I'm 10 minutes late checking in one day, is my pay docked for the time? Or, if I check in 15 minutes early everyday, do I now get paid for this? What is the real effect of "punching-in"?

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    When we move to Bi-Weekly, Non-Exempt Employees will be paid Hourly for time worked and that is defined by when the employee clocks in and out.  If an employee clocks in early, it will add to hours worked and could result in overtime being paid.  If an 8 hour/day employee clocks in late and clocks out on time, his/her time worked will be less than 8 hours so he/she will be paid 7.75 hours for that day in this example.  This answer is assuming this is an isolated incident.  Any consistent deviation from an employee's schedule would need supervisor approval.

  • At this time I have a percentage of one check going to one bank and another percentage going to another bank (from each pay check). When payroll changes take place, will they continue with this setup or do I need to submit another request?

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    If the amount of direct deposits are being split strictly by percentage then you do not need to do anything.  If any one of them is by a dollar amount it will need to be changed if you do not want that dollar amount taken out of each check.

    Concerning direct deposit: For most employees that receive a mid-month draw, the change to bi-weekly is not that great because the current set up applies either the dollar amount and/or the percentage to both the mid-month draw and the monthly paycheck so the change is moving from 24 pay periods per year to 26 pay periods per year.

    If you want to change a dollar amount on your Direct Deposit, please fill out the Direct Deposit form.

  • I currently receive pay once each month. I do not receive mid month draw. Can I continue to receive pay this way, or will I be forced to the bi-weekly pay system? I am a Fire contract employee.

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    When we complete the transition to a bi-weekly system all employees will be paid on a bi-weekly basis.  The entire system, including benefit plans available, open enrollment, payments to some vendors, etc., will be configured for a bi-weekly pay frequency.

    Note:

    Fire CLA Page 52 section M. Bi-Weekly Payroll.  "With sixth (60) days advance notice, Boise City may implement a bi-weekly payroll system."  

    Police CLA Page 8 Section 4.A(1)  "With 60 days notice, Boise City shall implement a bi-weekly payroll system."

  • I am curious about flexible spending deductions for unreimbursed medical or childcare expenses. Do we need to double check our deductions or will the payroll system adjust automatically to reach the annual amount?

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    You will not need to do anything, the payroll system will adjust automatically.

    • On the August 10 check, the last monthly check, the same amount will be deducted as in previous months. 
    • The August 24th check, the first bi-weekly check, will have no flexible spending deductions since the August amount was fully taken on August 10th. 
    • Starting in September, the deductions will be calculated over 24 pay periods, i.e. 50% of the monthly amount will be taken from the first two pay checks of each month which will add up to the correct annual amount.
  • I work a 9-hour day M-Th and a 4-hour day on Friday (and I am exempt). Can I assume that if a holiday falls on Friday, 4 of those 8 paid holiday hours will accrue as vacation since I will have already worked 36 hours at end of business Thursday?

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    Holiday hours count toward the FLSA 40 hour work week after which overtime is paid or Compensatory Time is accrued so if you actually work 36 hours and have 8 hours of Holiday in the same FLSA work week you will accrue 4 hours of Compensatory Time.

  • Will my current deductions (taxes, ins,direct deposits ) be evenly divided between the first two checks/pay periods per month?

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    Taxes, PERSI, Deferred Compensation contributions, Child Support, Garnishments and Levies will be taken on all pay checks starting in September, i.e. over all 26 pay periods in a year.  Direct Deposit allocations will also happen on all 26 pay checks.

    All other deductions including insurance premiums will be taken from the first two pay checks in a month.  The related Flex and Wellness credits will also happen on the first two pay checks in a month.

  • Who do I notify to stop my mid month draw? Who do I contact about 401K deduction? Who do I contact about deferred comp deduction? Who do I contact about my health savings account? Do I need to contact anyone about PERSI?

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    You can stop a mid-month draw by contacting HR-Payroll:  Cathy Prado at 384-3721 or Ken Carlsen at 433-5606.  If you have questions concerning your benefits, you can contact the HR-Benefits Department:  Kristin Holtz at 384-3859 or Carla Miller-Lowe at 384-3856.

  • I see an online form to file a change in the 457 deduction so that the amount is equalized over the paychecks, but I don't see one to do the same thing with my Persi 401k. Where do I find the Persi form?

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    The PERSI 401(d) form is now in the Employee Toolbox as well.

  • Why is it that the Shift Code 3000 displays the shift as being 8 am to 4 pm with no lunch when the standard shift is really 8 am to 5 pm with lunch. While it still shows the shift to be 8 hours, in detail it is wrong for the vast majority of exempt staff.

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    For exempt employees we pay them by 'duration' which means that the 8 hours is the important item not the actual start and stop times displayed.  Our choices were 1.-To have it display exactly 8 am to 5 pm but, to get the duration to 8 hours with that display, it inserts an hour lunch row which adds cumbersome functionality for exempt employees and clutters the screen.  Or, 2.-To make time entry as simple as possible for the employee, the down side was the display of 8 am - 4 pm on the Payroll Summary Screen.  The decision was to make time entry as simple as possible for the employee and live with the display because the display has no consequence for an exempt employee.

  • When will a reimbursable cost (mileage and cell phone stipends) show up on a paycheck after documentation is submitted?

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    The methodology and process for reimbursable costs through Payroll will be addressed after the implementation of both CyberShift and Lawson sometime in 2012.  

    In the meantime these items continue to be reimbursed through Accounts Payable.

  • Some of my team members are maxed out on annual leave and take a day off during the month so that they don't lose it. With accruals occurring every payday they will need to use that day or hours the first two weeks of the month? Is there a conversion chart that shows how many hours are accrued every two weeks?

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    Employees will need to use time before it reaches the maximum, which is not a change.  We are working on a rule that will warn employees hen they are within 80% of their maximum but it is not deployed yet.  I would encourage employees to use enough time to give themselves a cushion. 

    There is a bi-weekly Leave Accrual Schedule posted to the Employee Toolbox under the Bi-weekly Pay Information and Self Help link.

  • If I loose my badge, how do I get another one?

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    Call Human Resources at 208-384-3850 for a replacement Clock Card.

  • Flexible Spending Account Discrepancy, details within.

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    Question:

    I noticed an answer above that conflicts with what actually happened on my August 10th paycheck as it relates to flex spending accounts.  See question #28 and the associated answer.  The amount withdrawn from my paycheck for the flex spending account did change on August 10th, contrary to what I believed would happen.  Where I have had $225 taken out of my paycheck every month so far this year, on August 10th I only had $187.50 taken out of my check.  The answer to question #28 led me to believe that I would have the full $225 taken out of my paycheck on August 10th and there would not be anything taken on the 24th.  Why did it work out different for me than what was explained in answer #28?

     

    Answer:

    The difference in the Flexible Spending Account (FSA) amounts on the August 10th was not anticipated since we separated the Bi-Weekly Pay Group from the Monthly Pay Group.  However, PeopleSoft knows what the annual FSA goal amount for each employee should be and automatically adjusts.  When this was investigated, the conclusion was that PeopleSoft was behaving as it should and that is the reason for the change in the amounts.  By the September 21 pay those amounts should stabilize.  We apologize for any inconvenience.

     

  • How do I change my user name and password?

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    User names can be changed.  If employees change them in the PeopleSoft System through HR.  The system will then create a new login account for them.  The password is usually set to a default and they can then change it.  We can then delete the old ID.

  • Why did the lone FY11 NonBase Sal change from $24 to $12 in the last pay period?

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    Non-base pay increases appear on an employee's paycheck as an addition to pay. A recurring payment may happen for several reasons, but the most common explanation is that an employee has reached the maximum of his/her pay grade. All non-base increases are only distributed for one year and expire on September 30th at the close of the fiscal period. The increase will continue or be recalculated if it is replaced by another increase for the next fiscal year.

    Based on feedback we received applying the non-base increase to all employees in FY10, this causes problems with employees budgeting that income. Regardless of the amount, it's understandable people become accustomed to seeing that on their pay advice. In response, it has been recommended that future non-base increases be distributed in one lump payment.

     



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